Church Acoustics & Sound Systems

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Acoustical Proof of Worship Space Failures

Posted by jdbsound on December 30, 2020


Almost every church has a sound system. It is supposed to be a tool to preach the Gospel message with. When that goal is achieved, it turns out that such a sound system is also excellent for the singing portion of the worship. In a survey done a few years ago, most church sound systems failed at meeting all of the requirements for worship. During the survey, approximately 90% of the worship spaces were limiting the performance of the sound system. In some cases, where churches had expensive “State of the Art” sound systems with the latest digital technology, the acoustical condition of the room limited the performance of the sound systems to 70% or less.

These sound systems were limited in many ways, including even when the congregation can sing over 85dB, but if the sound system was even louder than 83dB, people vigorously complained that the sound system was too loud. Other issues included the need for expensive drum shields, which can cost thousands. Many churches are turning to In-Ear Monitors, and all of the hardware needed to go with the system that cost thousands. In many churches, they were limited in the number of open microphones that could be used, or everyone had to have headset microphones and so on. What is also distressing is that most churches are investing more money into technology and replacing the technology in cycles of 15 years or less- long before the equipment is worn out or obsolete.

What would happen if you could fix the acoustics of the worship space permanently with an acoustical system that can be repainted in future renovations to last the lifetime of the church building? What if that permanent fix could get 90 to 100% performance out of your existing sound system or any future system expansion? What would happen if you only needed to replace sound equipment whenever it failed because of age, rather than trying out the latest technology? What does the latest technology get you in a room that is underperforming acoustically? Does investing into the newest hyped up devices, making promises that can only be reached if the room is fixed in the first place, do anything to help people understand the Gospel better, or is it better to just pacify people through a better entertainment quality sound system? What happens if we turn to the Bible to look for answers? The only example of a worship space is in the details of Solomon’s Temple. That was an edifice that was built over 3500 years ago, and if it was truly The House of God, then why did God allow it to be destroyed?

Is there any proof or evidence that if a church is designed like Solomon’s Temple as it is detailed in the Bible, it would not be suitable for modern worship today?  Are there any existing churches that have the same details of Solomon’s Temple, less the gold? If there is, how does it sound? If no place exists, then why isn’t there at least one?  Does Solomon’s Temple have anything to offer modern churches today? How can a building that some say is just a myth, a building that is said to have never existed, be relevant today? What could ancient technology possibly be usable in an ultra-modern church? Was there something that was in Solomon’s Temple that is usable in churches today, even if the modern church doesn’t resemble anything close to Solomon’s Temple? If the technology of Solomon’s Temple is transferable into existing churches, what does it say about the existence of Solomon’s Temple? Can a myth fix modern churches?  Has any of this technology been applied to existing churches? 

Jesus gave us the last supper, the communion that all Christians celebrate.  By that example, shouldn’t we follow the example of how to design a house of worship that Jesus designed – if we believe John 1:3 “All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made”?  Why do churches go against what Jesus did for us in this issue? After all, Jesus is alive today. Why do we treat Jesus as someone who is exclusively from the past?  When did Jesus and God stop being in the present?

In the Gospel of John, it begins with “in the beginning was the WORD and the Word was with God.”  This is about the past and how all things came to be.  At the end of the Gospel, after Jesus rose from the dead, John said, (John 20:31)  “but these have been written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing you may have life in His name.”  Here, John clearly makes a transition where Jesus in not just the Son of God in the past, but is the Son of God in the present.

As a Christian, the teaching is that the whole Bible is the Word of God. The Bible is the word of God for the past – lessons from which to learn from; for the present – how we are to live day to day with God today; and for the future – to know where we go when we die and how the future of the world will be. Every part of the Bible has something to teach us today, and that includes what we should know about Solomon’s Temple. Was the destruction of Solomon’s Temple of God’s failure to protect His House, or was it to tell us that the details of Solomon’s Temple has valuable technology that is meant to be used in all churches after Jesus rose from the dead?  Here is a link that teaches about how Solomon’s Temple is relevant to churches today.

Here is a link to photo albums of over 40, of the 400 plus churches that have already applied this ancient technology of Solomon’s Temple with amazing results. Any church can benefit from this technology today.  The cost of such a system that can help save lives is priceless, but it is possible to add it to all churches, especially when it costs less than a typical sound system upgrade or replacement.

Please leave any comments you might have in the comment section below.

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